Award

Amélie Juhin wins ESRF Young Scientist Award 2017

18. 5. 2017 | The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) User Organisation has awarded the title of Young Scientist 2017 to AcademiaNet researcher Amélie Juhin for her experimental and theoretical studies of resonant X-ray scattering and X-ray dichroism.
Dr Amélie Juhin on ESRF's ID26 beamline
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(© ESRF / C.Argoud)


Dr Amélie Juhin on ESRF's ID26 beamline

AcademiaNet member Dr Amélie Juhin is the winner of the ESRF "Young Scientist of the Year 2017". Each year since 1995, the ESRF Users' Organisation awards one scientist aged 37 or younger for outstanding work conducted at the ESRF.


Dr Juhin is a physicist and spectroscopist at the "Institut de minéralogie, de physique des matériaux et de cosmochimie" in Paris. She received the prize in recognition of her work on dichroism - a property of some materials, which allows them to absorb polarised light to different degrees depending on the direction of polarisation. She regularly uses the powerful X-rays produced by the European synchrotron in Grenoble to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of nanoparticles and molecular magnets.


The Chairman of this year's jury, Dr Andrei Petoukhov from the University of Utrecht, praised Dr Juhin's work: “Amelie Juhin is awarded the 2017 ESRF Young Scientist Award for her experimental and theoretical studies of resonant X-ray scattering and X-ray dichroism. She has matured into an independent scientist whose contributions are marked by a deep and thorough understanding of the physics and mathematics behind the interactions of X-rays with different substances, including minerals and magnetic materials.”


Aged just 36, she is already praised as an international expert in her field. Her contribution to the field of dichroism and X-ray resonant inelastic scattering has earned recognition from her peers - as demonstrated by her winning several awards, such as the Farrel Lytle Award 2015 from the International X-ray Absorption Society and a Bronze Medal from the CNRS in 2016.


  (© ESRF / AcademiaNet)

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