Letter from the Editor

Looking for Excellent Female Researchers: 'No More Excuses!'

Robert Bosch Stiftung publishes AcademiaNet brochure

27. 10. 2014 | Almost four years ago, AcademiaNet started in November 2010 with its database of excellent female researchers. Now we have more than 1,600 selected members from all over Europe. In this new brochure, the Robert Bosch Stiftung discusses achievements and future challenges. Download the PDF here!
AcademiaNet Cover English
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AcademiaNet Cover English
In this leaflet, Nancy H. Hopkins gives an honest and personal account on the topic 'women in science' in her lead article. The professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has been fighting for equal opportunities in science for over thirty years.
And four AcademiaNet members, Artemis Alexiadou, Paula Booth, Mary Kaldor and Karin Lochte, answer questions on their careers in science.

In the article 'Equality by Law?', the pros and cons of statutory quotas to promote female researchers in academia are discussed as affirmative measures.

Ingrid Wünning Tschol, who initiated the AcademiaNet project, explains how everything started: When she organised the 2008 EuroScience Open Forum ESOF in Barcelona, she had invited a few female keynote speakers, who had all cancelled except one. 'It was then that I realised that we needed a database where the many outstanding women scientists could be found with one mouse click.' When someone is looking for excellent female researchers now - there are 'no more excuses!'

The 12-page brochure was a supplement to the October 16th edition of 'Nature'. If you missed that edition, you can download the English and German versions here:

PDF-Download (English)

PDF-Download (German)
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More information

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No more excuses!

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