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News

  1. AcademiaNet member Antje Boetius receives German Environmental Prize along with Leipzig Waste Water Experts

    Marine biologist Prof. Dr. Antje Boetius and an interdisciplinary team of wastewater experts from Leipzig will each receive half of the 2018 German Environmental Prize award by the German Federal Environmental Foundation (Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt, DBU). German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier will present the award this week on 28 October in Erfurt.

  2. Rural development - a ticking time bomb?

    We speak with AcademiaNet member Professor Seema Arora-Jonsson, who researches how rural development and environmental governance are carried out in rural areas and what effects gender and ethnicity have on the development.

  3. Antje Boetius Elected to European Academy of Sciences

    Prof. Antje Boetius is an expert of marine biogeochemistry. Her studies include the exploration of Arctic deep-sea life under the ice, as well as the long-term observation of the effects of global warming on polar ecosystems.

  4. Nano-Wires Supply Power

    Some microorganisms form nanowire connections to transfer electric energy. Researchers from Antje Boetius' research group have discovered this transfer between dual-species microbial consortia that degrade methane.

  5. Wood on the Seafloor

    A team of Max Planck researchers from Germany now showed how sunken wood can develop into attractive habitats for a variety of microorganisms and invertebrates.