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Antje Boetius Elected to European Academy of Sciences

19. 10. 2016 | The European Academy of Sciences EURASC is a non-profit, non-governmental organization of distinguished scholars and engineers located in Liège, Belgium. It features 500 members from 63 countries, including 65 Nobel Prize and Fields Medal winners.
Prof. Antje Boetius
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Prof. Antje Boetius
Prof. Antje Boetius is an expert of marine biogeochemistry, biological oceanography, deep-sea biology and microbial of the ocean. She works on polar seas, on chemosynthetic ecosystems and other extreme habitats. Prof. Boetius has lead or participated in over 45 seagoing expeditions, and she has coordinated many national and international ocean research programmes. Boetius and her team are renowned for their contributions to the diversity and function of life associated with seafloor processes, including pelagobenthic coupling, gas seepage and fluid flow, and the structure, function and dynamics of microbial communities of the ocean floor.

The Boetius group uses novel technologies and methods for the study of life at the bottom of the ocean. Current studies include the exploration of Arctic deep-sea life under the ice, and the long-term observation of the effects of global warming on polar ecosystems as well as on hypoxic aquatic ecosystems. Antje Boetius is Professor of Geomicrobiology at the University Bremen, and leader of a joint research group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research and the Max Planck Institute of Marine Microbiology. She is also Vice Director of MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences.

Prof. Antje Boetius
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Prof. Antje Boetius
For her outstanding research, Prof. Boetius has been awarded the Medaille de la Societe d'Oceanographie de France, the Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz Prize of the DFG, an Advanced Grant of the ERC, and the Petersen Price, among many other honours. Antje Boetius has been elected to the German National Academy Leopoldina, and to the Academy of Sciences and Literature Mainz. She is an elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and of the American Academy of Microbiology. She engages much in public outreach and transfer of knowledge on the role of the ocean in the Earth system, as well as on the value of biodiversity.

Antje Boetius has studied Biology and Biological Oceanography at the University of Hamburg and Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. Her PhD thesis dealt with deep-sea microbiology and biogeochemistry. She became Professor for Microbiology in 2001 at the Jacobs University in Bremen, and was Group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology from 2003-2008.

The European Academy of Sciences EURASC is an independent international association of distinguished scholars that aims to recognise and elect to its membership the best European scientists with a vision for Europe as a whole, transcending national borders with the aim of strengthening European science and scientific cooperation and of utilising the expertise of its members in advising other European bodies in the advancement of European research, technological application and social development.

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