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Best of interviews from 10 years of AcademiaNet

10 years AcademiaNet

16.11.2020 | We have dug deep into the AcademiaNet archives of the last ten years to present you some of the most interesting interviews we published in our news section. Join us on a throwback journey with interviews that are still relevant today.
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(© unsplash / CoWomen)



Prof. Dr. Marlies Knipper
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Prof. Dr. Marlies Knipper

“Female academics tend to be too passive”
Marlies Knipper, Professor of Molecular Physiology at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, is determined to do her part to bring about gender equality. She has organised a Club of AcademiaNet scientists who meet regularly to discuss challenges they face and to further their knowledge on topics that are relevant today.



Prof. Seema Arora-Jonsson
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Prof. Seema Arora-Jonsson

Rural development—a ticking time bomb?
In many parts of the world people are leaving the countryside. Prof. Seema Arora-Jonsson researches how rural development and environmental governance are carried out in rural areas and what effects gender and ethnicity have on the development.



Prof. Jo Shaw
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Prof. Jo Shaw

What is a EU citizen?
Prof. Jo Shaw, Salvesen Chair of European Institutions, asks, Does uniformity stabilise the union? Or does the strive for uniformity drive the national governments apart? With Brexit in mind, this interview is particularly worth a read.



Prof. Ulrike Zeshan
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Prof. Ulrike Zeshan

Communication across language barriers
Professor of Sign Language Linguistics, Ulrike Zeshan and her unique team of deaf academics at the University of Central Lancashire, work closely with deaf communities around the world to understand how sign languages vary in different countries—and how to empower these communities.



Dr. Meron Zeleke Eresso
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Dr. Meron Zeleke Eresso

Religious conflict: more than meets the eye
Dr. Meron Zeleke Eresso from Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia finds that religion plays an important part in promoting peace and reconciliation—and that in many cases, conflicts that are regarded as religious actually have social and economic causes.



Prof. Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly
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Prof. Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly

Women’s roles in courts and culture
Prof. Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly’s studies have shown the critical role of women in shaping the culture of Europe'’s courts from the 16th century onwards, although German literature of the period often frames women as disruptive or dangerous.



Prof. Dame Athene Donald
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Prof. Dame Athene Donald

Evidence-based politics and women in science
Prof. Dame Athene Donald has much to say about the role of science in society, the importance of science communication and gender equality in academia. Donald is a Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Cambridge.



Prof. Polly Arnold
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Prof. Polly Arnold

Society’s problem with parity
Only a minority of science professors today is female. Prof. Polly Arnold is the producer of “A Chemical Imbalance” and a strong fighter for women in science. She says: “Don’t be afraid to fail”.



Dr. Agnieszka Golec de Zavala
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Dr. Agnieszka Golec de Zavala

Narcissism: not only an individual failing
We live in polarised times and more and more people harbor anger and grievances about their lot in life. What is underlying these feelings? Dr. Agnieszka Golec de Zavala is one of the world leaders in the field of the concept of “collective narcissism”, which implies exaggerated notions of importance and positivity attached to a group.


  (© AcademiaNet)

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