Award

Caroline Gutjahr wins SEB President’s Medal 2018 in Plant Biology

5.7.2018 | Biology Society honours AcademiaNet member
Caroline Gutjahr
Bild vergrößern
(© Andreas Heddergott / TU München)


Caroline Gutjahr


This week, one of four SEB President’s Medals will be handed to AcademiaNet member Dr Caroline Gutjahr. The SEB President’s Medals are awarded annually to young scientists of outstanding distinction.

Nominees to a President’s Medal are among the best in their respective fields: they are strong researchers or scientists in the early stage of their career. They may be leading their own group, are well respected by their peers and regarded as a creative and novel thinker. All those attributes apply to Dr Gutjahr. Only last year, she took home a substantial ERC Starting Grant for her project ‘Regulatory networks of plant cell rearrangement during symbiont accommodation’ (RECEIVE) and was appointed Tenure Track Professor at the Technical University of Munich.

Her research is very much interdisciplinary: Caroline Gutjahr looks into the biology and function of arbuscular mycorrhiza, a symbiosis between plants and beneficial soil fungi, which augments plant nutrition with mineral nutrients. Using a combination of molecular biology, genetics, cell biology and biochemistry she aims at understanding plant molecular mechanisms, causing changes in plant cells that allow arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi to colonise these cells. Moreover, she investigates how molecular mechanisms interconnect plant and symbiosis development, and how this may allow plants to orchestrate arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis with their physiological needs under changing environmental conditions.

This year’s medals will be presented in Florence on the occasion of the SEB annual meeting.
  (© AcademiaNet / SEB)

More information

Additional articles on this topic

Testimonials

  1. Read what our members say about AcademiaNet.

Follow us

News

  1. Regine Ortlepp’s heating-beat project wins the 2022 German Sustainability Award for Research

    The project is coming up with solutions to debilitating summer heat in cities, in collaboration with people that live there

  2. ‘The most striking difference about the human brain is just how big it is’

    Madeline Lancaster is known as the inventor of brain organoids, also called ‘mini brains’. We caught up with her for a conversation about how we can study psychiatric conditions in a tiny clump of cells, and what exactly it is about the human brain that sets it apart from that of our closest relatives.

  3. Emily Flashman wins Norman Heatley Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry

    The chemist was chosen for her work on oxygen-sensing enzymes

  4. Four AcademiaNet members elected as Fellows and Foreign Members of the Royal Society

    Sandra Knapp, Susan Lea, Maria Leptin and Irene Miguel-Aliaga have all made “outstanding contributions” to their respective scientific fields or science as a whole

  5. Veronika Kalmus and Kairit Tammets win prizes for education research papers

    The two AcademiaNet members’ papers both focused on technology use in a school setting

 
Academia Net