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Organise Your Own AcademiaNet Club!

27.1.2016 | AcademiaNet is a database featuring excellent female researchers. But if you're a member, it's also a way to meet other researchers from your town or region, because women in science often have a lot in common, even if they are from different fields or different generations.
Although things have improved in recent years, as our own informal survey among AcademiaNet members has revealed recently, much remains to be done: still only 17.5 percent of senior academic posts are held by women in the UK, and only about 15 percent in Germany. This is why AcademiaNet was founded in the first place: to make excellent female researchers more visible in the public realm. And it further helps our cause to team up and meet successful female researchers from other fields. Now the Bosch Foundation is supporting 'AcademiaNet Clubs', so that AcademiaNet members from a city or region can meet informally and exchange ideas.

Prof. Christina Haubrich
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Prof. Christina Haubrich
Several AcademiaNet Club meetings have been held in Germany in the past two years, and the first UK meeting took place last September in Cambridge, with 18 scientists from our network attending. "AcademiaNet has been transformed from virtual life into reality. This should be a starting point for a vivid intellectual exchange between great female scientists in the UK, and I am already looking forward to our next get together," wrote Christina Haubrich, one of the two initiators of the meeting, the other being Lori Passmore. At the Cambridge meeting, political scientist Humeira Iqtidar from King's College London gave a lecture about the ideas presented in her book: 'Secularizing Islamists?' based on her research and interviews in Pakistan.

If you are also interested in setting up an AcademiaNet Club in your area, the organisational procedure is simple: one or two AcademiaNet scientists in a city or region simply plan the first meeting, and the Bosch Stiftung helps by providing a list for distributing the invitations and also has a preprepared leaflet. If at least seven members express an interest, you can invite them to a restaurant. And you don't need to have a guest speaker or a lecture, you can also just meet informally and discuss your work and ideas. For more information, please contact eva.roth@bosch-stiftung.de.

We hope that more and more of our members team up and form their own network of highly successful female researchers.
  (© AcademiaNet)
Susanne Dambeck

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