Award

Werner Prize 2018 awarded to Prof Sandra Luber

21.6.2018 | AcademiaNet member Prof Sandra Luber wins prestigious Swiss research award
Prof Sandra Luber
Bild vergrößern
(© Universität Zürich)


Prof Sandra Luber | Prof Sandra Luber, Universität Zürich


The Swiss Chemical Society awarded the Werner Prize 2018 to Pof. Sandra Luber, SNSF Professor at the Universtiy of Zürich, for her excellent research accomplishments in the field of theoretical and computational chemistry.



On die occasion of the SCS Spring Meeting dinner, Alain De Mesmaeker, SCS President, presented the prize to Prof Luber for outstanding research achievements in her blooming career. Her work covers a wide range of approaches, mostly with emphasis on highly accurate methods derived from quantum mechanics, which she has applied to a wide variety of challenging systems. Prof Luber has already received a number of research awards, including the IBM Research Prize for Computer Modelling and Simulations in Chemistry, Biology, and Materials Science, and the ETH medal for an outstanding PhD thesis. In 2017 alone, she took home three accolades: Firstly, she has been the first theoretical scientist to receive the Clara Immerwahr Award, secondly, she has been the first woman to receive the Hellmann Award of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Theoretische Chemie and thirdly, she won the Robin Hochstrasser Young Investigator Award.



The Werner Prize is awarded to outstanding young scientists under the age of 40 working in Switzerland, honouring exceptional research in the field of chemistry. The prize was established in 1936 and has been awarded annually since 1958.







  (© AcademiaNet / Swiss Chemical Society)

More information

Testimonials

  1. Read what our members say about AcademiaNet.

Follow us

News

  1. ‘The most striking difference about the human brain is just how big it is’

    Madeline Lancaster is known as the inventor of brain organoids, also called ‘mini brains’. We caught up with her for a conversation about how we can study psychiatric conditions in a tiny clump of cells, and what exactly it is about the human brain that sets it apart from that of our closest relatives.

  2. Regine Ortlepp’s heating-beat project wins the 2022 German Sustainability Award for Research

    The project is coming up with solutions to debilitating summer heat in cities, in collaboration with people that live there

  3. Emily Flashman wins Norman Heatley Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry

    The chemist was chosen for her work on oxygen-sensing enzymes

  4. Four AcademiaNet members elected as Fellows and Foreign Members of the Royal Society

    Sandra Knapp, Susan Lea, Maria Leptin and Irene Miguel-Aliaga have all made “outstanding contributions” to their respective scientific fields or science as a whole

  5. Veronika Kalmus and Kairit Tammets win prizes for education research papers

    The two AcademiaNet members’ papers both focused on technology use in a school setting

 
Academia Net